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Check your balls once a month - it could save your life

Testicular cancer: The life-saving lowdown

You’re about to discover the single most important fact about testicular cancer that you (probably) didn’t know.
This fact is good news. You see, in the battle of man vs cancer, we’re all a lot stronger than we might think.
The one stat you should take on board, and never lose sight of, is this:

More than 96% of men who get testicular cancer will be cured.

And if every man reading this page were to follow our advice, then together we’d have the potential to boost the cure rate even more.
Now wouldn’t that be incredible?

Monthly ball-checks – and why you need them

Although most cancers get more common as you get older, testicular cancer is different. It’s most likely to happen when you’re young or middle aged.
Testicular cancer is the most common cancer of 25 to 49-year-old men (but it happens to younger and older guys too).
If you’re male and aged 15+, a simple monthly ball-check will give you the best chance of beating the disease should it ever happen to you. Here’s how to do it:

GET FAMILIAR WITH YOUR BALLS. CHECK THEM ONCE A MONTH.


How to check your balls

  1. Get to know how your balls look and feel normally.
  2. Once a month, take a few minutes to check for any changes:
    • The best time is after a bath or shower
    • Rest your balls in the palm of your hand, and gently roll each one between finger and thumb
  3. If you find something strange, don’t stew over whether it’s serious or not. Go straight to your GP! This will give you the best chance of early diagnosis in the rare event of testicular cancer.

Early diagnosis means:

  • Better chance of successful treatment
  • Quicker and more straightforward treatment

Remember: Ball problems are usually caused by something much less serious than cancer, but you should never try to figure out what's wrong without your doctor’s advice.

CHECK YOUR BALLS REGULARLY, BUT Avoid DOING IT in public.
No one wants to see that!


What to look for

It’s normal to have one ball slightly bigger, or hanging slightly lower than the other. That’s why you should get to know what’s normal for you and then look for changes. These could be:

  • A lump (which might be painless)

  • Increased size

  • Hardness

  • Pain or heaviness in the ball sack

If you think you might have found something, but you're hesitating at the thought of seeing your doctor, then read this now:

Pledge to Check

Take a positive step in the fight against testicular cancer today by pledging to check your balls once a month.

Join our pledgers’ community, and not only will you get free reminders that make remembering to check a cinch, you’ll also be doing your bit to raise the profile of ball-checking – and help empower others too.

Pledge to Check now, and join the winning team in the battle against testicular cancer!